Wow!!! Airto and Flora Purim Live

August 11, 2008

Thats a wonderfull and classic Brazilian Group. We should know more about them.

Watch the part 2 and 3 here.

Airto Moreira:
The most high-profile percussionist of the 1970s and still among the most famous, Airto Moreira (often simply known by his first name) helped make percussion an essential part of many modern jazz groups; his tambourine solos can border on the amazing. Airto originally studied guitar and piano before becoming a percussionist. He played locally in Brazil, collected and studied over 120 different percussion instruments, and in 1968 moved to the U.S. with his wife, singer Flora Purim. Airto played with Miles Davis during part of 1969-1970, appearing on several records (most notably Live Evil). He worked with Lee Morgan for a bit in 1971, was an original member of Weather Report, and in 1972 was part of Chick Corea‘s initial version of Return to Forever with Flora Purim; he and Corea also recorded the classic Captain Marvel with Stan Getz. By 1973, Airto was famous enough to have his own group, which was signed to CTI and appeared on Purim‘s sessions. Since then, he has stayed busy, mostly co-leading bands with his wife and recording as a leader for many labels, including Buddah, CTI, Arista, Warner Bros., Caroline, Rykodisc, In & Out, and B&W. Not all of his music as a leader would be called jazz, but Airto remains a very impressive player.

Flora Purim:
Influenced by both traditional Brazilian singers and the improvisations of American jazz divas like Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan, Flora Purim was one of the most adventurous singers of the 1970s. After meeting and marrying her husband, percussionist Airto Moreira, in their native Brazil, Purim moved with him to the U.S. in the late ’60s. Though she worked with Stan Getz and pianist Duke Pearson before the decade ended, it wasn’t until joining Chick CoreaJoe Farrell,Stanley Clarke, and Moreira in the original Return to Forever in 1972 that she became well known in the States. Purim showed considerable promise on Forever classics like “500 Miles High” and “Light As a Feather” and lived up to it when she went solo with 1973’s Butterfly Dreams. Ranging from superb to passably decent, Purim’s Milestone dates of the mid- to late ’70s kept her quite visible in the jazz world. Purim’s work grew erratic and uneven in the 1980s, and she wasn’t recording as often (though she did provide one album for Virgin and three with Moreira for Concord’s Crossover label). Purim didn’t record very often in the early to mid-’90s either, but she continued to be highly regarded in Brazilian jazz circles.

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